Category: Lecture Capture

Video Code Easter Eggs

I have this sneaky trick I use to tell which students watch online videos and which don’t.  I hide “secret codes” in the videos (like the programmer’s Easter Eggs).  When a student finds one of my “Easter Egg codes” they can submit it for 1 point towards participation.  Sometimes the codes are numbers I generate at random (Ex: 40234) and sometimes it’s a word, phrase, or story (my cat is chasing a fly in front of my computer). I don’t tell the students where the codes are. I don’t tell them HOW I’ve shared the code or what kind...

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Hard-learned Tips on Screencasting

My latest column for MAA Focus, Becoming a Screencasting Star, is now available online.  In this post, I include a collection of “Hard-Learned Tips” on screencasting – these are things I wish someone had told me before I recorded my first set of videos.  For example … Mind Your References. Don’t mention specific texts, sections, or page numbers in your screencasts. If you do, then switching to a different text or a new edition will suddenly make all your videos out of date. If you must reference a section or page number, do it in the text that accompanies...

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Record with a Document Camera and a Flip

In my Math for Elementary Teachers (MathET) course, we do a lot of work with math manipulatives, puzzles, and games of various sorts.  Some of this work can be done with virtual manipulatives, but only if all the students have a computer too.  As a result, we do a lot of classroom work with old-fashioned hands-on math manipulatives, and I demonstrate using a document camera. Since the beginning of Fall semester, I’ve been trying to figure out how to record these hands-on demonstrations to put in the online course shell, but the best I could figure out was to hold my little Flip video camcorder with my left hand while I write and rearrange the board with my right hand. (Note that there is not room on the document camera station for a tripod.)  Unfortunately, this results in a shaky video, it is tiring, and it’s hard to do everything with one hand. After doing this for about six months, on Monday I had this flash of insight (one of those ideas where you wonder why it took that long to have the idea).  I was considering the idea of using masking tape to affix the Flip to the Doc Camera during class (which wouldn’t work because of the need to press the on/off button) … and I realized that I had a very simple solution in my pocket....

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Best of the Ed Tech Freebies!

In a “pilot” program, we used Camtasia to record several sessions at the 2009 AMATYC Conference in Las Vegas.  Several of these recordings are now available on the AMATYC 2009 Conference Proceedings Website. In particular, you might want to check out my live presentation “Best of the Educational Technology Freebies” … at least, you can check out the first 24 minutes of it (before my spectacular graphics-overload-induced red-screen-of-death computer crash).  The live presentation starts approximately 1 minute into the video. There is a Part II (audio with a few PowerPoint slides – all my computer was capable after burning up the graphics capability temporarily), but I guess they haven’t put it up yet.  Update: Part II is now also available here.  Incidentally, this incident sealed the deal on my getting a new tablet PC (I was running with the memory capacity and hard drive maxed on the old one). Word to the wise: You should not attempt to simultaneously record new audio narrative for a Camtasia video project running in the background, while running that video in a player on the notebook and projecting to a screen.  Sure, it works for 5 minutes, but will it work for 60? [no, unless you have a really powerful computer and graphics card] The easy way to find all the recorded videos from the 2009 AMATYC Conference is to search the Conference...

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Online Course Design for Mathematics

This week I have been participating in the MAA PREP course, Calculus: Online and Interactive. I was asked to give a presentation on online course design for mathematics, and the presentation was recorded. This is a loooooong one (two hours), but it is packed with information, ideas, and design tips.  If you’re going to teach online for the first time, or just want some guidance for revamping your online math course, I think you’ll find it helpful. There are nine parts to the presentation: Virtual Classroom (overall course design) Interactive Learning Materials Video Lessons Online Homework Blended Environment Student Engagement Equations and Graphs Orientation and Setup The Math Testing Issue You can view the slides below or here. Online Course Design for Math Uploaded on authorSTREAM by wyandersen | Upload your own presentation To watch the whole presentation, go here to the Adobe Connect recorded webinar. There are also two mindmaps that you might want to investigate that are mentioned in this presentation: Online Math Using the Internet to Spice Up Your Math Course You may also be interested in the online Calculus textbook, Calculus: Modeling and Application, 2nd edition, which may be used free for the next academic school year (supported by an NSF grant). Possibly Related Posts: Learning at Scale Slides from ICTCM Elaborations for Creative Thinking in STEM The Importance of Findability for Learners Learning Math is...

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