Tag: Mindomo

Mindmap for Studying Social Media

For the last two years, I’ve been studying social media from all angles in anticipation of teaching a full course on Social Media (which I did in the Winter 2012 semester).  During that time, I tweeted all sorts of articles, videos, blog posts, and resources related to all aspects of Social Media. Today I’m doing a 4-hour workshop on Social Media for the MCCVLCC, and in an effort to organize and make sense of two years of study, I decided to build a mindmap about Social Media from all the tweets I’ve made about this in the last year.  ...

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Mindmap: Play and Learn

At the end of yesterday’s presentation, I included a link to a new interactive Mindmap called “Play and Learn” (shortcut is http://bit.ly/PlayLearn). This map is organized by subject and includes games or simulations that are available for each.  If you know of other games that are useful (focusing on high school / college age), please send them along to busynessgirl at gmail dot com or comment them in here. Possibly Related Posts: AMATYC Keynote Notes: Challenge and Curiosity Full version of Algeboats is out! Board Games that Change Attitudes Level Up: Video Games for Learning Algebra Coming out of...

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Carnival of Math: Mindmap Edition

Okay, okay … the Carnival of Math is late.  Sorry Mike! Being something of a nonconformist, I thought I’d try something completely different!  This month, the Carnival of Math is in the form of an Interactive Mindmap.  So you’ve never used a mindmap?  Watch the quick tutorial (no sound). Also, I’ve just thrown in my favorite posts from various math blogs that I read, so you may be surprised to see your own post in here! Possibly Related Posts: Elaborations for Creative Thinking in STEM Learning Math is Not a Spectator Sport Recorded Webinar: Teaching Math in 2020 AMATYC Keynote Notes: Challenge and Curiosity AMATYC Keynote Notes: Interaction and...

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Mindmaps for Learning

I’ve been using a web-app called Mindomo for about two years now. With it I am able to map out ideas and create interactive sets of resources in a non-linear fashion. You may have seen some of my resources or been in a presentation where I used one of these maps: Web 2.0 for You Online Calculus Organize Your Digital Self Using the Internet to Spice Up Your Math Class There’s More to the Web than Facebook (for students) I think that using these interactive maps gives three main advantages: If you present with a map, you are no longer forced into a linear presentation and can easily respond and adapt to audience questions. The audience can play along during the presentation, wandering off to explore the areas of the map that interest them most.  This is the same idea behind Edward Tufte’s “supergraphic” – a data-rich resource that the audience becomes engaged with, each person in their own context. The process of creating a mindmap helps to organize resources and ideas, think of applications to ideas, fosters thinking about comparisons and contrasts, and helps you to see the holes where information or resources are missing, all in a very visual manner. It is this third item that has me particularly intrigued.  When I begin building a new presentation, I now find it helpful to organize a mindmap as...

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