Tag: Jarnal

5 Tips for Using a Bamboo Tablet

If you (or your college) can’t afford a tablet computer, then a peripheral tablet or digital pen can be a good inexpensive option. For those who have never used a Bamboo Tablet, it’s like writing with a pen.  You hold the stylus like a pen.  When you apply pressure to the tablet, the mark (digital ink) does show up on the screen, but… It’s also not like a pen, in that the friction between the stylus and tablet is much different than that of ink gliding across paper.  This causes an “unanticipated roughness” in the appearance of text written on the tablet. That being said, here are my 5 tips for using the tablet: 1.  Use proper ink width.  If you are given a choice, that is.  Your choice of ink width will probably depend on your writing style.  If you normally have small writing, you may want to use a thinner ink width.  Likewise, if you make larger letters, try a thicker ink.  Here are examples of different widths: 2. Relax. Clutching the pen and writing slowly is not worth the effort. You’re better off trying to imitate what you do naturally (with a real pen) than trying to “reteach” your hand how to write altogether. Here’s what I mean. 3. Find a comfortable way to hold the stylus without disturbing the pen buttons.  If you accidentally press...

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Jarnal Tutorials

A peripheral tablet (like the Wacom Bamboo tablets we gave away at the workshop) can be a very inexpensive option for getting handwriting to the screen.  Unfortunately, obtaining a software program that is designed for this purpose is not as easy.  Windows Journal, although designed for use on tablets, is only available with Windows XP Tablet and certain versions of Windows Vista.  Incidentally, if you have Windows Vista, and are trying to find Windows Journal, try typing “Journal” into the search box in the start menu. Another tablet option is to buy OneNote, but if you’re already trying to save money, this kind of defeats the purpose (and it’s not available for Linux or Mac). Which brings us to Jarnal.  Jarnal is open-source freeware built by David K. Levine and Gunnar Teege.  It can be used in Windows, Linux, or Mac operating systems (see the download page).  Yes … this means all of your online students could use it for free! Jarnal is not a program that I use regularly (because I have a tablet PC, Journal, and OneNote).  However, one of our workshop participants, Daniel Kopsas, turned out to be an expert on using  Jarnal with a peripheral tablet. Even better, he was inspired to make an awesome set of Jarnal Tutorials during the workshop and has put them on the web for everyone to use! The Jarnal...

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Top 10 Technology Tools for Math 2008

1. Jing gives students and instructors the ability to capture an image of any graph or equation they see on their screen and share it anywhere else (message boards, emails, papers, digital assignments). Using Jing you can also record videos of up to 5 minutes in length. [Free, Mac/PC] Not sure how to use Jing? Check out the tutorials at the end of this post. 2. Wolfram Demonstrations provides close to 3,000 interactive demonstrations on mathematics. Students and instructors can play with demonstrations by downloading Mathematica Player. Demonstrations can be written by anyone with a copy of Mathematica and are reviewed before they become part of the Demonstrations Project. [Free, Mac/PC] 3. WebAssign is a publisher-independent site for online homework. It was designed originally for physics and does a particularly good job of handling the problems unique to learning math-based content. Publishers work with WebAssign to create online homework for their texts. [$ for students, PC/Mac] Note: You can write your own problems for WebAssign, in which case, there would be no cost for students. WeBWorK is also worth a mention here for the more technically-inclined. 4. WizIQ provides a platform to easily hold online office hours. You have the option of audio and video on both ends, multiple users, interactive whiteboard, and file upload. Sessions are recorded and can be accessed for 30 days. [Free, Mac/PC] 5. Windows...

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Jarnal: Like Journal, But For Any Platform

I can’t believe I never posted this. I certainly meant to. A while ago I asked Kenrick Mock if he had any suggestions for programs like Windows Journal that would run on non-tablet computers. Why would you want one? Well, students can use them to sketch a graph or write a few steps of a problem. Also, those of you with peripheral tablets (like the Wacom Bamboo) still need to have tablet software, and Windows Journal is not so easy to get if it doesn’t come with your computer. A couple of my students tried these out and said they did actually work okay. Jarnal: an open-source application for notetaking, sketching, keeping a journal, making a presentation, annotating a document – including pdf – or collaborating using a stylus, mouse or keyboard. NoteLab: an advanced “digital notebook” specifically designed for tablet computers. Tablet PC Post: has an interesting collection of Tablet software that might be of interest to you, each is a little different. Grafigo: this is Corel’s version of the standard tablet drawing interface. Possibly Related Posts: Group Exploration in Math Elaborations for Creative Thinking in STEM Learning Math is Not a Spectator Sport Recorded Webinar: Teaching Math in 2020 AMATYC Keynote Notes: Challenge and...

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