Category: Equation Editors

eLearning Tools for STEM

For anyone who has ever had trouble convincing your administration to give you the proper tools to teach online, I give you this little gift: eLearning Tools for STEM, published today in eLearning Magazine. The tools for STEM eLearning Tablets Recording & editing software Jing Equation software and training Synchronous communication system Online homework system Other head-turning resources for STEM Wolfram Demonstrations Digital libraries (a lengthy list) Video collections (another list) TI-SmartView Other tips (about accessibility, computer labs, etc) can be found at the end of the article. You can read about all the tools, and why I recommend them, by going to the article, eLearning Tools for STEM. Possibly Related Posts: Contemporary Algebra Collection (new resources 2/4/2019) Teaching in Higher Ed Podcast about ESIL Lens Add Graphs In The World to Courses Taking the Algebra Out of College Algebra Understand in learning objectives – it’s the forest, not the...

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Getting Math in Moodle is Easy

Very rarely do learning management systems (Blackboard, Angel, D2L, etc.) do math well.  However this is definitely the exception. Personally, I use Moodle as an LMS on TeachingCollegeMath to host discussion groups and workshop materials.  It’s free, it’s relatively painless to get it up and running, and frankly, it tends to get features that incorporate new technologies faster than the other guys. One thing that Moodle does particularly well is math.  Just turn on the LaTeX editor and you’re good to go.  When I was getting started, I asked Bob to make us a tutorial on how to get your math editing up and running in Moodle.  Kindly, he obliged (click here) and I was surprised how easy it is.   I swear, this one is painless.  First, you turn on TeX notation in Moodle: Then you can use TeX or use MathType to paste the TeX into Moodle!  Since I am notoriously bad at using TeX, Bob was nice enough to make me a second video showing us exactly how to go from MathType to Moodle.  The surprising part?  You can go in reverse too!  Just drag the equations from Moodle back to MathType!  Watch the video to see how. Possibly Related Posts: Contemporary Algebra Collection (new resources 2/4/2019) Teaching in Higher Ed Podcast about ESIL Lens Add Graphs In The World to Courses Taking the Algebra Out...

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Ctrl-E Hotkeys for MathType in Office 2007

You may recall that I took the Office 2007 plunge over a year ago and gave up after a month because it wasn’t compatible with Adobe Acrobat 8.  Well, it’s a year later and (in preparation to install some other software that overlays Office), I decided to try again. First, I can report that my prior Acrobat – Office 2007 issues have been resolved. Second, if you have to upgrade to Office 2007, but already have a prior version of Office and MathType installed, I have instructions for going through this process. Third, if you’ve got both Office 2007 and MathType installed, but would like to change the keyboard commands for opening or closing an inline equation, watch the MathType tutorial video. Possibly Related Posts: Contemporary Algebra Collection (new resources 2/4/2019) Teaching in Higher Ed Podcast about ESIL Lens Add Graphs In The World to Courses Taking the Algebra Out of College Algebra Group Exploration in...

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History of Tools in the Teaching of Math

Somewhere around hour #28 of dissertation research, I began looking for the answer to this question: Anyone know a resource where someone has documented a timeline of math technologies for teaching or math innovations (pedagogical) that have been introduced? Today (at hour #53) I stumbled across a possible answer to this question. Yes, there is a book (with a 2008 copyright) that outlines tools of American Mathematics Teaching.  I’ve got it ordered, so I can’t review it yet, but for those of you intrigued about technologies (computer-based and other) I thought I would at least pass along the resource! In Tools of American Mathematics Teaching, 1800–2000, Peggy Aldrich Kidwell, Amy Ackerberg—Hastings, and David Lindsay Roberts present the first systematic historical study of the objects used in the American mathematics classroom. They discuss broad tools of presentation and pedagogy (not only blackboards and textbooks, but early twentieth—century standardized tests, teaching machines, and the overhead projector), tools for calculation, and tools for representation and measurement. Engaging and accessible, this volume tells the stories of how specific objects such as protractors, geometric models, slide rules, electronic calculators, and computers came to be used in classrooms, and how some disappeared. Possibly Related Posts: Contemporary Algebra Collection (new resources 2/4/2019) Teaching in Higher Ed Podcast about ESIL Lens Add Graphs In The World to Courses Taking the Algebra Out of College Algebra Group Exploration...

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TeX Inventor on GoogleTalks

Donald Knuth is known as the inventor of TeX (among other things). A visit to his website is interesting (be sure to check out Knuth vs email since 1990). Most of the talk is about Knuth’s book 3:16 Bible Texts Illuminated (the premise of the book is an analysis of stratified sampling of the Bible). Thanks to Bob for forwarding this link! Donald Knuth Authors@Google Possibly Related Posts: Contemporary Algebra Collection (new resources 2/4/2019) Teaching in Higher Ed Podcast about ESIL Lens Add Graphs In The World to Courses Taking the Algebra Out of College Algebra Group Exploration in...

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