Level Up: Video Games for Learning Algebra

Last week I gave a presentation at AMATYC about video games for learning algebra. As usual, Mat Moore did a fantastic illustration for the prezi.

It was staged in five levels:

  • Level 1: Why use games?
  • Level 2: What is a game? (manipulatives, puzzles, and games)
  • Level 3: Become a Math Game Critic
  • Level 4: Play GOOD Games
  • Level 5: Good Algebra Video Games?

You can click through the Prezi below.

 

Possibly Related Posts:


Share

Playing to Learn Math (new version)

I am at the Kansas City Math Technology Expo this weekend doing two talks.

Today’s talk was Playing to Learn Math? I gave this at TexMATYC in the spring, but just updated it to add some non-digital types of play that you can use in the classroom.  There are five great math games mentioned in this presentation. Direct links to these games are below:

Possibly Related Posts:


Share

Playing to Learn?

This is a rebuild of the Presentation I did in Texas called “Playing to Learn Math?” It is focused on a general audience in education and includes many more games and simulations than the prior version.  Before you click through, think about this …

  • 99% of boys aged 12-17 play video games
  • 94% of girls aged 12-17 play video games
  • 50% of teens played video games “yesterday”

Pew Research, Teens, Video Games, and Civics, 2008

Since 2006, the rate of Internet use for teens aged 12-17 has been 93-94%, with roughly 40% using the Internet “Several Times a Day” (Pew Research, Millenials: A Portrait of Generation Next) The next time you have a student who says they don’t have access to the Internet, stop and consider.  To not teach students to use the Internet (and use it appropriately) is akin to leaving out a crucial job/life skill like reading.  If that same student said they “didn’t have access to books” how would you respond?  Our campuses have both computer labs and libraries. Is it unreasonable for students to be expected to use both if necessary?

Possibly Related Posts:


Share

Playing to learn math?

This presentation, built yesterday, is my philosophical argument for why we should be actively pursuing games as a way to teach algebra. In fact, you’ll find that many of the definitions of games and game design principles sound like they are describing algebra. Of course, the presentation misses something without my accompanying talk, but it has enough to get you started thinking about where we could be going with math education.

It took me 12 hours just to build the presentation you see below … and collaboration with my assistant and an illustrator.  I’ve been obsessively reading and thinking about this topic for about two years.

Possibly Related Posts:


Share

Dimenxian: “Learn Math or Die Trying”

This was a featured article in Distance-Educator.com
What is it? It’s an algebra game produced by Tabula Digita called Dimenxian. You can download a demo of the game on the Dimenxian website. They also provide a list of alignments to NCTM Standards for Algebra with the game. For the record, the website says there is a trailer for the game… but I can’t get it to work, so if someone else figures it out, please comment on how to do it. I have downloaded the demo and tried the first “mission” … but I think I need more practice moving around and navigating in the game. From my five minutes of trial, it seems 90% game and 10% algebra, but perhaps that’s just because I’m not good at it yet. I’ve got some time trapped in airports this weekend, so I’ll give it another go and see if I can’t find more algebra in it.

The game also does not encompass all of the topics we teach in algebra (really, it seems to focus on topics related to graphing). But it does engage the students and they learn algebra (read the article, research on middle school students).
However, I’ve been saying for a while now that college textbooks are only a few years from becoming multimedia experiences first, and books second (or not at all)… here is my evidence that text-based learning will be replaced (in some circumstances) with media-based learning experiences… and probably it’s coming sooner than you think! Give me a “game” that’s 80% algebra and 20% game and I’d be happy to test run it in one of my online or hybrid classes!

Possibly Related Posts:


Share