Category: Math for Liberal Arts

Add Graphs In The World to Courses

Now you can add Graphs in the World to your courses in the LMS! Create a new “page” in your course. Open the editor on that page. Go to the HTML Editor on that page. Paste the following text and then save the page: <iframe width=”750″ height=”1400″ src=”https://www.inoreader.com/stream/user/1004872044/tag/GraphsInTheWorld/view/html?cs=m” frameborder=”0″ tabindex=”-1″></iframe> When you’re finished, you should get a page that looks something like this. There are other ways to subscribe to Graphs In the World: RSS Feed: https://rsshub.app/instagram/user/graphsintheworld Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/graphsintheworld/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/graphsintheworld/ Thanks to Martin Brinkman for posting directions on turning any Instagram account into an RSS feed. Thanks to Laura Gibbs...

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Bringing the Real World to Your Math Class Every Day

I’ve been spending the first 5-10 minutes of every 2-hour math class discussing graphs in the news with my students. I’ll give you a few examples of what came up naturally week by week: Lots of social media graphs: Slope of the adoption rates for new users, the DAU (daily active users) and MAU (monthly active users) over time, and comparison of the adoption of new features in different platforms (Snapchat, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter) Tech industry: Growth of Amazon, Facebook, and Google, rise in employees at these companies, and comparison the money spent on Black Friday in the...

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History of Numeration Systems

I just stumbled upon this great little video about Ancient Numeration Systems.  It does not go into depth on any particular system, but it wanders through the following: Tally marks Sumerian symbols Babylonian symbols Egyptian symbols Roman symbols and modifications of it Number systems based on the body (Zulu) Commerce-based number systems (Yoruba in Nigeria) Number systems involving knots and string (Persians, Incans) Numerals 0-9 (invented in India) Place value Fractions as a solution for “fair-share” situations in culture Unit Fractions (Egyptians) Fractions with base-60 (Sumerians and Babylonians), still used for time measurements today Abacus (Chinese) Use of the...

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Math about the Electoral College

This was a surprisingly good video about the math of the U.S. Electoral College system.  At first I kept saying “but wait a minute…” but all my concerns were addressed in the video, and then some.  I was surprised by the revelation (towards the end of the video) that it is theoretically possible (although not likely) to win the seat of President of the United States with less than 23% of the popular vote.  Wow. There is some great math of ratios and percents here.  You can find data and other pertinent information about the Electoral College here. You...

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Math Videos at the Sputnik Observatory

The Sputnik Observatory, is dedicated to providing a venue for viewing and sharing ideas and philosophies of contemporary culture.  Jonathan Harris, who worked on the mindblowing sociological website We Feel Fine, is the site director and blog creator for Sputnik Observatory.  Sputnik also has a host of codirectors with diverse backgrounds in journalism, architecture, and ballet.  Members of Sputnik have spent the last ten years interviewing scientists, philosophers, academics, and the like.  They have over 200 videos of conversations on themes such as coherence, interspecies communication, and urban metabolism. “Sputnik Observatory is a New York not-for-profit educational organization dedicated to the study of contemporary culture. We fulfill this mission by documenting, archiving, and disseminating ideas that are shaping modern thought by interviewing leading thinkers in the arts, sciences and technology from around the world. Our philosophy is that ideas are NOT selfish, ideas are NOT viruses. Ideas survive because they fit in with the rest of life. Our position is that ideas are energy, and should interconnect and re-connect continuously because by linking ideas together we learn, and new ideas emerge.” Here are some of the short interviews that involve mathematics (and all really COOL mathematics).  All of these can be embedded into course shells. Will Wright – Possibility Space Ian Stewart – Alien Mathematics Ian Stewart – Pattern-Seeking Minds Lord Martin Rees – Simple Recipe Trevor Paglen –...

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