Category: Calculus (SV)

More Related Rate Problems

David R. Hill (of Demos with Positive Impact) was nice enough to create demos for the three problems I requested on a previous post. The Cylinder Problem The Beacon Following a Person Problem The Inverted Cylindrical Tank Problem All of these demos, and more, can be found in the Related Rates Gallery at the Demos with Positive Impact site. Now that we know David’s reading… does anyone have any other suggestions for problems that need demos? Possibly Related Posts: Bringing the Real World to Your Math Class Every Day Collection of Math Games Math Game: Antiderivative Block Playing to Learn Math (new version) Calculus Tweetwars: The...

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Net Change Theorem (animated applications)

I’ve been producing videos on definite integrals this week for my online calculus class, and I’m particularly proud of this Video Lesson on the Net Change Theorem. I have rebuilt the PowerPoints to include animated examples of water filling a reservoir… … and particle motion… showcasing the difference between displacement and distance traveled. The animations were built completely in PowerPoint, with voice-over and recording using Camtasia. I had a bit of a flashback last night as I stayed up late laboring over these animations. When I was in high school, 15 years ago, my senior project was work in animation. I’m pretty sure that my ability to animate now is a direct result of my learning how to animate 15 years ago. Who knew then that I would find that year of animation work helpful now? I can’t even remember what software I was using then! Sometimes I hear instructors say that you could never teach an online class with the same quality as a traditional class, and while they cannot be directly compared… I am 100% sure that this semester, my online class gets better “lectures” than my traditional class. I teach the traditional class, and then rebuild all the PowerPoints and build in animations for the online class. Next time around, the traditional class will also get the benefit of the added animations, but it is unlikely...

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Radioactive Decay

This Radioactive Decay Java applet can be found in the National Curve Bank. It was written by Cindy So (Cal State LA) and includes all the data you’d ever need to do realistic radioactive decay problems. You can use the Java applet to compare graphs of elements with different decay rates, and calculate the age of an item based on the original and remaining amounts, among other things. There is also a nice historical plot of the Carbon-14 decay rate with various items and their Carbon-14 dated age. Although radioactie decay problems are often thought of as precalculus level problems, remember that calculus students can also do these problems by looking at the differential equation that describes the rate of decay (also described on this site). Possibly Related Posts: Contemporary Algebra Collection (new resources 2/4/2019) Add Graphs In The World to Courses Bringing the Real World to Your Math Class Every Day Taking the Algebra Out of College Algebra Group Exploration in...

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Surfing Derivatives

I was playing with a newly discovered website collection of applets tonight and I found this cute one on “surfing” curves for derivatives. You’ll need an updated Java plug-in for this one. If you really object to the little guy on the surfboard, you may toggle him off! The entire collection of Manipula Math with Java applets can be found here. Some of the applets have been done in a more sophisticated fashion by other sites, but it might be worth a browse! Possibly Related Posts: Bringing the Real World to Your Math Class Every Day Collection of Math Games Math Game: Antiderivative Block Playing to Learn Math (new version) Calculus Tweetwars: The...

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Draw the function from the derivative graphs

There is a great TEC module that comes with the Stewart Calculus text CD that has students examine the first and second derivative curves and determine properties of the original function by placing this information on sign charts. I just used this module in a video lesson for my online Calc class, and it can be found on the Internet here, so I thought I would share it with you. It could certainly also be used in a traditional class if you have a computer and a projector. There are four different examples you can use. I walked students through the first function in a video, and then assigned two other functions for participation points (they can take screenshots and submit them). Possibly Related Posts: Bringing the Real World to Your Math Class Every Day Collection of Math Games Math Game: Antiderivative Block Playing to Learn Math (new version) Calculus Tweetwars: The...

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