Category: Calculus (SV)

Math Videos at the Sputnik Observatory

The Sputnik Observatory, is dedicated to providing a venue for viewing and sharing ideas and philosophies of contemporary culture.  Jonathan Harris, who worked on the mindblowing sociological website We Feel Fine, is the site director and blog creator for Sputnik Observatory.  Sputnik also has a host of codirectors with diverse backgrounds in journalism, architecture, and ballet.  Members of Sputnik have spent the last ten years interviewing scientists, philosophers, academics, and the like.  They have over 200 videos of conversations on themes such as coherence, interspecies communication, and urban metabolism. “Sputnik Observatory is a New York not-for-profit educational organization dedicated to the study of contemporary culture. We fulfill this mission by documenting, archiving, and disseminating ideas that are shaping modern thought by interviewing leading thinkers in the arts, sciences and technology from around the world. Our philosophy is that ideas are NOT selfish, ideas are NOT viruses. Ideas survive because they fit in with the rest of life. Our position is that ideas are energy, and should interconnect and re-connect continuously because by linking ideas together we learn, and new ideas emerge.” Here are some of the short interviews that involve mathematics (and all really COOL mathematics).  All of these can be embedded into course shells. Will Wright – Possibility Space Ian Stewart – Alien Mathematics Ian Stewart – Pattern-Seeking Minds Lord Martin Rees – Simple Recipe Trevor Paglen –...

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Calculus Rhapsody

A great find (thanks Caroline) … students definitely make the best videos. Calculus Rhapsody Possibly Related Posts: Teaching in Higher Ed Podcast about ESIL Lens Add Graphs In The World to Courses Bringing the Real World to Your Math Class Every Day Taking the Algebra Out of College Algebra Group Exploration in...

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Moving Math from Analog to Digital

Arthur Benjamin has been on TED in the past (see Mathemagics) and has done a really phenomenal job. Here’s his latest 3-minute appearance, called “A Formula for Changing Math Education.” The problem is that the very short talk does not present a “formula” for changing education, just Benjamin’s idea that the pinnacle at the top of the math pyramid should be statistics instead of calculus. There is nothing in the the short talk that suggests any kind of coherent plan for how it could be done, or even a suggestion that he has a plan. That’s what I would want to know about. Of course, it’s only a 3-minute talk and it’s certainly possible that he had nothing to do with the name of the talk. I did agree with these two statements, but want to add my own two cents: 1. “very few people actually use calculus in a conscious meaningful way in their day to day lives” … but I’m not sure we teach people how to use calculus in a “conscious meaningful way” nor are many of us required to use calculus for the simple reason that our superiors don’t understand it at all. Calculus could be used in a “conscious meaningful way” but our society chooses not to engage. As a matter of fact, very few people actually use statistics in a conscious meaningful way...

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Math of the Brown Sharpie

Before the world-wide-web, I doubt that math cartoons could seriously have been a popular or widely read endeavor.  Today, geeky cartoons have their own fan followings curtesy of the long tail.  Probably you’ve heard of xkcd and Indexed.  If you haven’t seen Brown Sharpie, you should check it out.  Here’s a couple of my favorites (since many of you are on Spring Break). Euler’s Formula on Spring Break Possibly Related Posts: Teaching in Higher Ed Podcast about ESIL Lens Add Graphs In The World to Courses Bringing the Real World to Your Math Class Every Day Taking the Algebra Out of College Algebra Group Exploration in...

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New Math: A Formula for Everything

I think that I will have to start (or end?) every class session next fall with one of these fabulous formulas from New Math. Some of them are obvious (once you see them) and some of them just have me laughing out loud because of the simplistic way Craig Damrauer can depict such a complex subject. A few of my favorites: Inspired by these great formulas, I think we should have a contest to see who can come up with the best “new math formula” for math words like Calculus, Algebra, Statistics, etc. Take your best stab at your favorite math word, and then link here. Here’s my contribution, and then I’m back to work on my dissertation (where all my creative energy is flowing these days). Possibly Related Posts: Teaching in Higher Ed Podcast about ESIL Lens Add Graphs In The World to Courses Bringing the Real World to Your Math Class Every Day Taking the Algebra Out of College Algebra Group Exploration in...

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