Category: Interaction

The Deliberate Practice Experiment

For some inspiration to try a more active approach to learning, I thought I would share a short video from Dr. Carl Wieman, who is a Nobel Laureate, a physicist, and more recently a researcher in learning science. Wieman has designed and run some very elegant experiments to demonstrate the effects of active learning techniques. Consider this one: What happens if you run two classes for a week with the same learning objectives, the same time in class, and the same assessment. Prior to the experiment, you take care to ensure that the student makeup and performance is very similar...

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Learning Math is Not a Spectator Sport

In November, I gave the keynote at the American Mathematical Association of Two-Year Colleges (AMATYC) Conference in Denver. I have given versions of this talk that are not specific for mathematics, but I don’t have recordings of those. I promise that the math in this talk is not inaccessible and is used more for examples than a framework for the talk. In other words, don’t let the word “math” scare you away. The alternate version of the talk is “Learning is Not a Spectator Sport.” The first half of the video is the awards ceremony, so I’ve directed the...

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Lean in to the Discomfort

When you walk in to a room full of people, choose someone who seems the most different from you (on the surface) or the person that seems the “scariest” to start a conversation with. Start there. Lean in to the Discomfort of having that awkward first conversation. In all likelihood, you DO have something in common with the person – seek to find it. If you always start with the conversation that you perceive to be the most difficult one to have, you will, over time, reduce your own fear of talking to strangers. About 90% of an iceberg...

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Students think they are MORE engaged Online

There was this inconspicuous article in the Nov 14, 2008 issue of The Chronicle of Higher Ed called “Does It Matter Where You Go to College?” (by Sara Lipka). The article was based on NSSE data (the National Survey of Student Engagement). The most interesting part of the article was the little table of data at the bottom of the page (click here for a larger version). I think that most faculty would be shocked to read this. Based on student perceptions, more students felt like they participated in important discussions in their online classes than their classroom-based classes. More students felt that course activities challenged them intellectually in online classes. In general, I think most faculty would perceive that the traditional classroom is a richer environment for discussion and course activities, but students seem to see it differently. Could it be that the traditional classroom is just a richer environment for the instructor? Possibly Related Posts: Group Exploration in Math Learning at Scale Slides from ICTCM Video of AMATYC Keynote The Deliberate Practice Experiment Clickety Click Click: Awful Measures for...

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