Learning Math is Not a Spectator Sport

Dec 4, 2016 by

In November, I gave the keynote at the American Mathematical Association of Two-Year Colleges (AMATYC) Conference in Denver.

I have given versions of this talk that are not specific for mathematics, but I don’t have recordings of those. I promise that the math in this talk is not inaccessible and is used more for examples than a framework for the talk. In other words, don’t let the word “math” scare you away. The alternate version of the talk is “Learning is Not a Spectator Sport.”

Three triangles surrounding a central triangle with the letters C, I, and D
The first half of the video is the awards ceremony, so I’ve directed the embed link below to begin when the keynote actually begins at 45:48 (direct link to video on YouTube beginning at the keynote is here).


The talk emphasizes the importance of interaction, and as such, this talk has a lot of audience interaction in it near the beginning, so you may want to jump through some of that interaction as you watch (between 51:30 and 1:02:00).

At the end of the keynote, audience members are invited to participate in a Weekly Teaching Challenge to continue exploring the ideas and research in the talk. You’re invited too. Just sign up!

 

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AMATYC Keynote Notes: Challenge and Curiosity

Nov 21, 2016 by

In the 2016 AMATYC keynote, I covered three main themes:

  1. Interaction & Impasse (last post)
  2. Challenge & Curiosity (this post)
  3. Durable Learning

Here are references and resources for Challenge & Curiosity:

First, I have to point you to one of my favorite books on the subject, A Theory of Fun for Game Design, by Raph Koster.

Quote from Game Design: “How do I get somebody to learn something that is long and difficult and takes a lot of commitment, but get them to learn it well?” – James Gee

How do players learn a game? 

  • They give it a try
  • They push at boundaries
  • They try over and over
  • They seek patterns

It looks something like this:

Shows web of many nodes and branches coming off a person, with bridges between branches and potential paths to expand knowledge.

How does a player learn a game?

How do we teach students?

  • We tell them what we’re going to tell them.
  • We tell them.
  • We tell them what we told them.
  • We have them practice repetitively.

It looks something like this:

Very few linear paths branching out from the person at the center. Few nodes and few places to expand on knowledge.

How do we teach students?

Reference: Productive Failure in Mathematical Problem Solving

There’s a much wider body of research on productive failure worth reading.

Video: Playing to Learn Math

Resource: Good Questions from Cornell

Resource: Classroom Voting Questions from Carroll College

Design more activities that let the student figure out the mathematical puzzle, instead of providing all the secrets yourself.

Shows the graph of a rational function with vertical asymptote at x=5 and horizontal asymptote at y=2.

Explain the differences in the graphs: The student is given five rational functions to graph, each function looks only slightly different mathematically but produces very different results.

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How do WE learn?

Apr 1, 2010 by

As adults, we learn in many different ways.  If you’re a teacher or an instructor, how many of these ways do you use with your students?

  • Practicing / Repeating
  • Reading
  • Internet
  • Discussing
  • Experiencing
  • Thinking / Reflecting
  • Experimenting / Playing
  • Academic
  • Creating
  • Hearing or seeing


This was one small piece of a keynote that I did in Scottsdale, AZ called Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age

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