Category: Edge of Learning

Clickety Click Click: Awful Measures for Learning

I feel a little inspired by Sam Ford’s post The Year We Talk About Our Awful Metrics. Ford writes about the need for change in metrics of online media publications, but we could just as easily be discussing the metrics of learning management systems, ed-tech vendor platforms, and institutional analytics. Ford argues that we need to “get serious” about better forms of measurement in 2017. As long as we are measuring metrics with little meaning, we aren’t really improving learning. Let me give you a few examples to illustrate the similar problems in education. Page Clicks As in, how many pages...

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Why high contextual interference?

This week I followed a hunch and, with the help of a friend who is a music educator, dug into some additional research around this idea of blocked and random practice. In music there are a few goals to achieve with any passage of music: can you play a passage accurately by itself? can you play the passage in the larger context of the piece? can you play the passage to tempo? can you play the passage with the right expression? Think about these goals in your own subject area and see if you can find a similar set...

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Recorded Webinar: Teaching Math in 2020

Just realized I never shared this webinar video from 2014 (you know, back when 2020 still seemed pretty far away). What Does Teaching Math look like in 2020? With every new iteration of technology, we create a generation of students whose primary media “language” for learning and interacting with the world is different than the one before it. In the last 5 years, technologies like free online videos, personalized learning software, and mobile devices, have been chipping away at the corners of education and traditional teaching. Technology-enhanced learning is here to stay, and it will alter the face of...

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AMATYC Keynote Notes: Challenge and Curiosity

In the 2016 AMATYC keynote, I covered three main themes: Interaction & Impasse (last post) Challenge & Curiosity (this post) Durable Learning Here are references and resources for Challenge & Curiosity: First, I have to point you to one of my favorite books on the subject, A Theory of Fun for Game Design, by Raph Koster. Quote from Game Design: “How do I get somebody to learn something that is long and difficult and takes a lot of commitment, but get them to learn it well?” – James Gee How do players learn a game?  They give it a try They...

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Interdisciplinary Courseware to the Rescue?

In the midst of all the bling of media-rich, adaptive, personalized, [insert-buzzword-here] digital products, there is a lurking underlying problem:   Teaching the same 100-yr old curriculum via innovative digital methods is not solving the real learning problems. #DLNchat #needbetter — Maria H. Andersen (@busynessgirl) October 11, 2016 The general education curriculum in higher education has barely changed. Today’s world is cross-disciplinary, culturally diverse, and team-oriented. There is almost no problem that can be solved in a silo content area with a team of one. We need new cross-disciplinary curriculum. We need courses that are more engaging and reflective of today’s...

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