Category: Edge of Learning

Teaching in Higher Ed Podcast about ESIL Lens

Back in December, I joined Bonni Stachowiak for an episode of Teaching in Higher Ed specifically to discuss the ESIL Lens. You can find the podcast here: “A New Lens to Support Learning Outcomes” The podcast gave me time to expand more on the reasoning behind the ESIL Lens. In a nutshell, There has been a tremendous shift in information access that has taken place in the last decade as Smartphones penetrated the consumer market. This shift requires us to rethink our learning objectives in education, and the depth we expect “knowledge” to be remembered and applied. If you...

Read More

ESIL: A Learning Lens for the Digital Age

In the early 90’s, most people had three reasonable choices for looking up the information you did not know: a book or journal you owned, the notes you took in class, or a library. In all of these cases, you had to physically move yourself to the location where the information source was stored. The best bet to be able to state information quickly was to know the information yourself. Given that we are humans, let’s assume the accuracy of all the information we hold in our heads is (at best) 80%. In the later 90’s and early 00’s,...

Read More

Bringing the Real World to Your Math Class Every Day

I’ve been spending the first 5-10 minutes of every 2-hour math class discussing graphs in the news with my students. I’ll give you a few examples of what came up naturally week by week: Lots of social media graphs: Slope of the adoption rates for new users, the DAU (daily active users) and MAU (monthly active users) over time, and comparison of the adoption of new features in different platforms (Snapchat, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter) Tech industry: Growth of Amazon, Facebook, and Google, rise in employees at these companies, and comparison the money spent on Black Friday in the...

Read More

Reimagining Calculus Keynote

Yesterday I gave the keynote at the Reimagining Calculus Conference held at Stevens Institute of Technology. I was able to record the audio/slides from my laptop. So if you want to revisit the talk or share it with colleagues, you can. This may very well be the talk remembered for “Maria blowing up factoring” (a bit controversial) and the themes from the talk were revisited throughout the day in the other talks and panel. Possibly Related Posts: Teaching in Higher Ed Podcast about ESIL Lens ESIL: A Learning Lens for the Digital Age Bringing the Real World to Your...

Read More

Adjuncts shouldn’t have to fix a broken system

For 10 years I taught as a full-time professor at a community college. My loads were between 4-4-0 and 5-5-4, depending on the year. Typically I had 2-4 preps each semester. With a PhD and two Master’s degrees my hourly wage was somewhere around $40/hr if I truly worked a 40-hour week and I received health care and retirement benefits on top of that. Realistically, benefits probably made my hourly wage more like $60/hr, but then working 60-hour weeks brought it back to about $40/hr. I left academia in 2012 to pursue a career in the corporate world, and...

Read More

Subscribe to Busynessgirl via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe.

Categories for Posts

Top Posts & Pages

Archives