Category: Personal Learning

Write an Operating System for Your Brain

Let’s face it. We all have to interact with organizations and systems of relationships in which we might not “fit” perfectly. We can choose to stay and try to thrive, or leave and find another path. Both are valid options. If you are choosing to stay, you will likely have to make minor (or sometimes major) tweaks to how you interact and function within that system. It is unreasonable to expect a system with thousands of employees or a family with 4 people in it to all change and adapt to you when you are unwilling to make changes to...

Read More

Self Evaluation: List of Fives

Whenever I hire a new assistant, I have a list of questions I ask to get a feel for how we can best work together.  I want to make sure I take advantage of their strengths and provide them the opportunity for growth.  I think that good working relationships are developed when each person’s skills are valued and when they can learn about the things that they enjoy. So, I’ve developed my “List of Fives” to feel out the strengths and growth areas for someone I’m going to work with, and I try to use it to help us...

Read More

TEDxMuskegon: A Recipe for Free Range Learning

I just realized I never posted the Recipe for Free Range Learning video from TEDxMuskegon.  You can watch the video or you can read a rough transcript of the talk, posted below. Here’s the text this talk was based on … “Free range learning” describes the learning that takes place outside of the formal boundaries of education. I’ve been asked if the existence of “free range learning” implies that there is also some sort of “caged learning” as well. Well, the current U.S. education system was developed in the industrial era using the principles of a “factory model.” So,...

Read More

Remembering What You’ve Read

While trying to get all my Kindle devices in re-sync (iPad, Kindle, Android, Laptop, and Desktop), I discovered a feature of the browser-based Kindle app that I wasn’t aware of. Remember the Ebbinghaus Forgetting Curve?  In 1885, Ebbinghaus showed that we need repeated exposure to information to store it in biological memory … and pretty much we’ve been forgetting things ever since. I try to build reflection into my learning routines (to take advantage of the Ebbinghouse curve) by doing things like rereading my tweets and the end of the week, organizing ideas into mindmaps, and composing blog posts...

Read More

Prezi: Future-Proof Your Education

Here is my new prezi (designed for students) called Future-Proof Your Education. How do you prepare for uncertain career paths where technical knowledge doubles every two years? You pay attention to the skills that surround the content: Interact, Flex, Learn, Explain, Analyze, and Focus. ANALYZE … think critically, interpret data, predict, solve problems, make decisions, scrutinize information sources EXPLAIN … convey ideas in writing, depict data visually, speak so that others understand, present ideas digitally FOCUS … observe critically, read with understanding, be self-directed, listen carefully, set and meet goals EXPLAIN … convey ideas in writing, depict data visually, speak so that others understand, present ideas digitally LEARN…find information quickly, reflect and evaluate learning, manage information, leverage tech to learn, metacognitive INTERACT … guide others, lead, collaborate, advocate and influence, resolve conflict and negotiate, share FLEX … be able to adapt, be creative, innovate, think across disciplines and cultures, design/usability Possibly Related Posts: Learning at Scale Slides from ICTCM Write an Operating System for Your Brain Clickety Click Click: Awful Measures for Learning Why high contextual interference? Recorded Webinar: Teaching Math in...

Read More
  • 1
  • 2

Subscribe to Busynessgirl via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe.

Categories for Posts

Top Posts & Pages

Archives